Posts Tagged With: illusion

Like beating your head on a brick wall trap


It’s Thursday: another exTRAPaganza for your GMing pleasure. 

You enter a long room from a door near one end with wooden floorboards that run across the narrower width. (On the map it looks like a long horizontal rectangle with vertical stripes. Tailor the length to the speed of your PCs, but we’d suggest nothing less than 100 feet long, 20 feet wide, and with the entrace 15-20 feet from the near end, to make sure everyone is running full tilt when they hit the wall.)

The only visible exit is at the far end of the room, on the narrow end.

As the party enters the room, the door slams shut behind them and the floorboards appear to start falling away one at a time, starting from the near end and moving towards the PCs. This is an illusion, but as the PCs can only interact with it by waiting for it to reach them, they will almost certainly start running towards the exit at the far end.

The exit’s another illusion. They instead run directly into a solid wall, which is just behind the illusory wall, so that when characters hit the wall and fall unconscious this is hidden from the people behind them. The real exit is in the near end, i.e. on the other side of the growing illusory gap, and is hidden by an illusionary wall.

You need to work out rules for damage based on movement speed (our suggestions are below), and it has an optional nasty secondary attack in that if you fail to disbelieve the illusion that you’re falling, you take imaginary falling damage.

If you’re feeling really nasty, you can always put spikes on the wall…

Interaction

 PFRPG:

D&D 4e:

Detecting   

 

 

Detecting illusory nature of floor and fall N/A unless interacted with; moderate Will save when falling floorboards catch up with PC N/A unless interacted with; modelled by secondary attack, below
Detecting illusory nature of exit ahead Strictly speaking, N/A until impact; wussy merciful GMs may allow a very hard Perception check to notice a lack of airflow, which reduces the Reflex save to halve the damage to merely hard. Strictly speaking, N/A until impact; merciful GMs may allow a very hard Perception check to notice a lack of airflow. A successful check reduces the attack vs Reflex from very hard to hard.

Evading

 

 

Breaking down the door by which they entered and leaving that way in time Hard Strength check, or attack vs normal door stats; those who hope to react in time need to make a hard Reflex save, with a -2 penalty for each person closer to the door than they are. Hard Strength check, or a single attack vs. moderate AC which must deal 15hp/tier to destroy the door. Those who hope to react in time need to make a hard Dex check, with a -2 penalty for each person closer to the door than they are.

Effects   

 

 

Running into a stone wall head first
[NB “running speed” refers to the total distance a character can cover per when running flat out]
1d6 damage per 20′ of running speed (so for a standard, unencumbered character, with base speed 30′ and running speed of 120′, 6d6), and a -4 penalty to Will and stunned for 1 round per 20′ of running speed. Very hard Reflex save for half damage and a -2 penalty to Will instead, then staggered for 1 round per 20′ of running speed. Very hard attack vs. Reflex.Hit: 1d10 per 20′ of running speed, and you are stunned and take -4 to Will (save ends). Aftereffect: dazed and take -2 to Will (save ends).Miss: 1d10 per 40′ of running speed, and you are dazed and take -2 to Will (save ends).
Believing you’re falling into an illusory pit Moderate Will save or take falling damage for the depth of the illusory pit (1d6 per 10′). If you have just run headfirst into a wall, take -4 on the save. Moderate attack vs. Will or take falling damage for the depth of the illusory pit (1d10 per 10′). If you have just run headfirst into a wall, you have a -4 penalty to your Will defense.
Categories: 4E, exTRAPaganza, Generic, Pathfinder | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

It’s Better to Just Fall Trap


Here is another installment of exTRAPaganza, our Thursday over-the-top trap series. 

This trap layers illusion and deception to deadly effect.

The first part of the trap involves a door, which should open inwards towards the character. There is a deep, circular shaft on the other side of the door. However, this is hidden by an illusion of another room, a hallway or whatever is suitable for the location.

The illusion is dispelled if the plane of the doorway is broken. At this point, the vertical drop shaft is revealed, requiring a Reflex or equivalent check to avoid falling down the shaft. The shaft itself has a ladder constructed of several iron rungs embedded into the side of the shaft, all within easy reach of the falling character. However, the rungs are actually razor-sharp blades, painted to disguise their true property.

At the bottom of the shaft is a pile of bones and corpses. Scattered about the edges of the shaft are fingers, toes, and small bones; evidence of those that were quick enough to catch themselves on the rungs.

Interaction

 PFRPG:

D&D 4e:

Detecting   

 

 

To spot the doorway illusion

Moderate Perception

As for PFRPG

To spot the rung blades

Very Hard Perception


As for PFRPG


Evading

 

 

To avoid falling down the shaft

Hard Reflex save

Trap attacks, +(Level/2+5) vs Reflex: Hit the character suffers effects listed under falling; Miss the character does not fall.

To avoid damage from rungs

Very Hard Reflex save

+(Level/2 +10) vs. Reflex: Hit the rungs damage the character; Miss the character takes no damage from rungs

Effects   

 

 

Falling: forcible relocation to the area below

As described

As described

+ standard falling damage, plus optional extras depending on area below

1d6 per 10 ft.; see core rules or here for extras

1d6 per 10 ft.; see DMG and DMG2 for extras

Catching the rungs

4d6, plus additional 1d3 Dex and 1d2 Con damage

(Level/3+1)d6 damage, plus character is weakened and takes 5 ongoing damage per tier (save ends both). 

Categories: 4E, exTRAPaganza, Generic, Pathfinder | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.