Bear Trap Cabinet


 

A stout wooden cabinet is in the corner.

Mechanical Trap

The inside of the cabinet contains some treasures. The doors are set to automatically close if any of the treasures are disturbed. The shelf that they are on has been set on a scale calibrated to the exact weight of the treasures. The doors have hidden spikes on them.

A DC 14 Wisdom (Perception) check reveals small holes along the inside of the doors, with the tips of spikes just being able to be seen.

A DC 16 Wisdom (Perception) check reveals a small, scale-like mechanism under the treasure shelf.

If any of the objects are removed from the shelf, the spikes project and the doors slam shut. The target must make a DC 14 Dexterity saving throw or take 2d6 piercing damage and become restrained. In order to be freed, the target must make a DC 14 Strength check to open up the cabinet doors.

The spikes can be disabled with a DC 14 Dexterity check with thieves’ tools. If the spikes are disabled and the trap is sprung, the damage is reduced to 1d6 bludgeoning damage, and the target is not restrained.

The shelf mechanism can be disabled with a DC 16 Dexterity check with thieves’ tools. Failure sets off the trap.

If the target wishes to replace an item with one of the same weight, this can be done with a DC 16 Intelligence (Investigation) check to determine the weight of the object. Failure results in disadvantage on the next part of the check to swap the item.

Swapping the item requires a DC 16 Dexterity (sleight of hand) check.

 

Categories: 5e, Dungeons and Dragons, mechanical | Tags: , | Leave a comment

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